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Test 9 Solutions

Test 9 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:20:57+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. There was sufficient evidence that the class had made reasonable progress.
  2. It is important to be properly equipped for learning.
  3. The verbs “to have” and “to be” need to thoroughly
  4. My manager is exaggerating when he says his classes always make outstanding progress.
  5. The pupil is becoming too dependent on her learning support assistant.
  6. All the dates for school trips need to be entered on the electronic calendar.
  7. Research shows that boys work better when there are firm boundaries.
  8. The analysis of my GCSE results shows that Pupil Premium pupils performed well.
  9. The changes had an immediate effect.
  10. The school’s appearance policy is non-negotiable.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Call to increase class sizes to give teachers more time for CPD

Secondary school classes should be increased significantly, to free up time for teachers continuing professional development an education academic has said.

professor Becky Allen said the UK has a “bizarre system where the youngest children have the largest class sizes and this decreases with age.

Appearing on a panel last week in new York Professor Allen was asked what radical reform she would introduce to improve teacher CPD.

Professor Allen said that increasing class sizes in secondary schools “could lead to a big reduction in teacher contact hours,” which would release extra time for CPD.

“I would just have a standard compulsory education for children until they leave school class sizes of 30 at least, she said “That is already 50 per cent more than a typical class size for children over 14.”

Speaking on the same panel professor Rob Coe, Director of the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring at durham University, also said that schools should prioritise time for teacher CPD over class sizes.

“Imagine youre teaching classes of 30 and you had the money that could reduce those to 24″ he said.

“For the same amount of money you could teach four days and have a whole day off and spend that whole day on professional learning.”

Answers: 

Call to increase class sizes to give teachers more time for CPD

Secondary school classes should be increased significantly, to free up time for teachers’ continuing professional development, an education academic has said.

Professor Becky Allen said the UK has a “bizarre” system where the youngest children have the largest class sizes and this decreases with age.

Appearing on a panel last week in New York, Professor Allen was asked what radical reform she would introduce to improve teacher CPD.

Professor Allen said that increasing class sizes in secondary schools “could lead to a big reduction in teacher contact hours,” which would release extra time for CPD.

“I would just have a standard compulsory education for children until they leave school, class sizes of 30 at least,” she said. “That is already 50 per cent more than a typical class size for children over 14.”

Speaking on the same panel, Professor Rob Coe, Director of the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring at Durham University, also said that schools should prioritise time for teacher CPD over class sizes.

“Imagine you’re teaching classes of 30 and you had the money that could reduce those to 24,” he said.

“For the same amount of money you could teach four days and have a whole day off, and spend that whole day on professional learning.”

Part 3A – Grammar

The History department

  1. runs an exciting educational visit this term.
  2. are running an exciting educational visit this term.
  3. is running an exciting educational visit this term.
  4. shall be running an exciting educational visit this term.

The course your child

  1. is going to learn for the first half term
  2. shall study for the first half term
  3. will be studying for the first half term
  4. would study for the first half term

is based on the “Horrible History of York”, looking at how the city

  1. we live in had changed.
  2. we live in can change.
  3. we live in has changed.
  4. we live in should have changed.

Part 3B – Grammar

As part of your child’s GCSE Geography course

  1. they must carry out fieldworks experience.
  2. they ought to experience carrying out fieldwork.
  3. they must experience carrying out fieldwork.
  4. they should carry out fieldwork experiences.

The physical geography fieldwork will be the major fieldwork,

  1. as it will cover human interactions about
  2. as it will cover human interactions concerning
  3. as it will cover human interactions through
  4. as it will cover human interactions on

a physical environment.

Students will then refer to their fieldwork in exam Paper 3. The questions will cover aspects

  1. like fieldwork planning, evaluating data collection methods
  2. such as fieldwork planning, evaluating data collection methods
  3. for example fieldwork planning, evaluating data collection methods
  4. for instance fieldwork planning, evaluating data collection methods

and data analysis.

Part 3C – Grammar

As you may already know,

  1. students have been studying
  2. students have been studied
  3. students had studied
  4. students had been studying

a selection of poetry from their anthologies.

This has been completed

  1. to prepare for their English Literature exams.
  2. in preparation for there English Literature exams.
  3. to prepare for there English Literature exams.
  4. in preparation for their English Literature exams.

We will also provide all students with a revision guide

  1. to support their understanding of the poems.
  2. to support them to understand the poems.
  3. for the support of their understanding of the poems.
  4. for supporting them to understand the poems.

Part 3D – Grammar

I write to give details of the Information Evening for parents of Year 10 students

  1. that will be held
  2. which is going to be held
  3. that is held
  4. who will be held

in the school hall next week.

The session is designed

  1. for giving you key information about
  2. to give to you key information on
  3. to give you key information about
  4. to give you key information on

how we monitor academic progress.

We anticipate that the session will last around 45 minutes and,

  1. following this, there will be
  2. after this is over, there will be
  3. once this is over, there will be
  4. when its finished, there will be

a number of senior staff available to answer general questions.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

The principal of one secondary school explains how giving students critical-thinking skills and a global outlook has become central to this school’s ethos

As the UK moves closer to leaving the EU in 2019, the necessity for schools to anchor their outlook in global citizenship becomes more apparent for meaningful education of our young people.

Global citizenship isn’t something that needs to be artificially created and imposed on schools. We already celebrate the rich, diverse and different cultures in our communities, and through looking at local identity and its relationship nationally and globally.

But, in these days of Brexit, “post-truth” politics, alternative facts, fake news, social media echo chambers and the threat of extremism, global citizenship is more important than ever, and should develop relationships as well as subject knowledge and skills.

Increasing individual critical faculties and encouraging the innate curiosity young people have to look beyond themselves ensures they develop the means to critically assess, participate actively in, shape and positively influence their world. Global citizenship is about a positive view of the world, society and diversity, and must counteract the binary, zero-sum approach of much current debate and discussion on a range of issues, including immigration, refugees, race, class and religion. It helps young people to understand the complex issues the world faces, applying and deepening their knowledge.

Global citizenship is also about continuing to develop a world-class education for every student, not only in terms of universal human rights and values, but also as a lifelong learner and as a global citizen.

The referendum vote on EU membership in 2016 and the aftermath doesn’t change this vision. In fact, it strengthens the need for all of us as educators, parents and citizens to ensure our young people are exposed to, participate in and integrate with the wider world as part of their education.

Global citizenship is also a way of maintaining breadth and balance in the curriculum, and educating young people in a less abstract way: engaging them in their national and global societies as future leaders who will shape and influence for the common good. Global citizenship should run through and across the curriculum at all key stages, enabling students to relate their studies in maths, science, humanities, languages, arts, sports and literature to the wider concept of being a global citizen and to their personal place in the local and wider society.

Global citizenship opportunities in schools should provide and develop skills such as critical thinking and self-management for our young people in education systems across the world. They are fundamental in enabling young people to access and participate in shaping modern society.

Technology plays a key role in developing global citizenship opportunities and, through my role as a British Council ambassador and Microsoft-Skype-Classroom educator, we engage weekly with teachers, students and schools around the world, discussing diverse and eclectic topics with participants from countries ranging from Canada and Belarus, to India and Indonesia. It truly does bring the world into the school community and connects classrooms

Part A: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

Explicitly contradicted

Supported

No evidence

  1. Global citizenship is becoming increasingly important in the modern world.

Supported

  1. The majority of global citizenship will be taught in PSHE and geography lessons.

Explicitly contradicted

  1. Assessments in global citizenship will prove that students are able to think about wider society as opposed to simply their personal space.

No evidence

Part B: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Head teachers
  2. Classroom teachers in general
  3. PGCE students
  4. Parents
  5. Social workers – L
  6. Heads of department – M

Part C: 

Select three appropriate titles for this article:

  1. Why global citizenship is more important than ever
  2. Technology the key to bringing the world together
  3. Global citizenship being introduced in schools to combat extremism
  4. Schools being forced to introduce global citizenship into the curriculum
  5. Global citizenship another example of ‘political correctness gone mad’
  6. Young people to positively influence the world through global citizenship at school
  7. Being a global citizen, more than ever, crucial for school children
  8. British values, and now global citizenship: when will it ever end?

Part D: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. Global citizenship should be taught mainly in key stage 4
  2. Global citizenship is a means to think about important issues more clearly and logically
  3. Since the UK will be leaving the EU, global citizenship will focus principally on non-European issues
  4. Global citizenship will help build bridges between different groups in our modern and diverse society in Britain
  5. The results of the Brexit referendum proves that we need to make young people more aware of world issues so that they don’t make similar mistakes
  6. Global citizenship will make young people have a deeper understanding of the key issues in the world and will make them think more broadly about their role in it
  7. Global citizenship encourages young people to be active, caring citizens that should undertake volunteer work
  8. It is not recommended that pupils in the UK communicate with schools around the world on Skype in case they offend them.