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Test 10 Solutions

Test 10 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:35:04+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. The absence rate in year 7 this year has been poor.
  2. The curriculum should be much more interesting.
  3. There should always be appropriate differentiation in every lesson.
  4. The poor behaviour in the French class was massively exaggerated.
  5. An assessment needs to be administered every half term.
  6. The key paragraph has been omitted.
  7. After some gentle persuasion, the class eventually settled down.
  8. It was no coincidence that the class performed well in the test.
  9. The class’ behaviour was a poor advertisement for the school.
  10. He was ingenious enough to overcome the limited budget.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Isleworth High School appearance policy

At isleworth, we believe that all students should dress in a smart and professional manner. Uniform standards apply on journeys to and from school as well as on the premises students in breach of the following appearance policy will be sent home to rectify the issue of concern.

Headwear isnt part of the school uniform and should never be worn inside the school building warm hats (not baseball caps may be worn in winter when travelling to/from school.

Hair should be conventional in style and in length above the collar and no shorter than a blade 2) and should not be artificially coloured spiked or contain styling products.

Students should not wear earrings or ear studs except one plain gold or silver stud in the lobe if they wish. the wearing of all other jewellery is not permitted as it conflicts with the schools policy of smart conventional appearance and can be dangerous.

Religious ornaments we realise are sometimes required to be worn students are welcome to do so where this is a requirement of their faith.

Answers: 

Isleworth High School appearance policy

At Isleworth, we believe that all students should dress in a smart and professional manner. Uniform standards apply on journeys to and from school as well as on the premises; students in breach of the following appearance policy will be sent home to rectify the issue of concern.

Headwear isn’t part of the school uniform and should never be worn inside the school building. Warm hats (not baseball caps) may be worn in winter when travelling to/from school.

Hair should be conventional in style and in length (above the collar and no shorter than a blade 2) and should not be artificially coloured, spiked or contain styling products.

Students should not wear earrings or ear studs except one plain gold or silver stud in the lobe if they wish. The wearing of all other jewellery is not permitted, as it conflicts with the school’s policy of smart conventional appearance and can be dangerous.

Religious ornaments, we realise, are sometimes required to be worn. Students are welcome to do so where this is a requirement of their faith.

Part 3A – Grammar

Dear Parent / Carer,

I am aware that many of our Muslim students will be observing Ramadan.

The advice for schools from The Muslim Council for Britain is that “in general, Muslims are encouraged not to use Ramadan as an opportunity

  1. to avoid aspects of normal life but rather to cope with normal life
  2. for avoiding aspects of normal life but rather to cope with normal life
  3. to avoid aspects of normal life but rather coping with normal life
  4. to avoid and to cope with normal life

under a different set of guidelines and conditions”.

Whilst the challenge and discipline of fasting is to continue with normal, everyday life,

  1. my staff might be aware of the commitment that students make to their faith.
  2. my staff will be aware of the commitment that students make to their faith.
  3. my staff is aware of the commitment that students are making to their faith.
  4. my staff may be aware of the commitment that students should make to their faith.

Students are still required to take part in P.E. lessons and events like Sports Day.  Staff

  1. will usually praise students who are clearly making a special effort
  2. will also, as always, praise students who are clearly making a special effort
  3. would also, as always, praise students who clearly make special efforts
  4. should, as always, be praising students who are clearly making a special effort

regarding their attitudes and behaviour.

Part 3B – Grammar

Dear Parent / Carer,

As you may be aware, we are holding our Year 8 Parents’ Evening on Thursday 4 May 2018.

The staff

  1. are going to appreciate this chance to meet and talk to you personally.
  2. would also appreciate this chance to meet and talk to you personally.
  3. would also like to show their appreciation with this chance to meet and talk to you personally.
  4. would personally also appreciate this chance to meet and talk to.

However, in special circumstances,

  1. it will not be possible for every teacher to offer an appointment to each student taught.
  2. it may be impossible for every teacher to offer an appointment to each taught student.
  3. it might not be possible for every teacher to offer an appointment to each student which they teach.
  4. it may not be possible for every teacher to offer an appointment to each student taught.

Students are responsible for arranging appointment times with their teachers,

  1. and are expected to attend the evening in full school uniform.
  2. and the expectation should be to attend the evening in full school uniform.
  3. and are expected to fully attend the evening in school uniform.
  4. and are expected to intend the evening in full school uniform.

Part 3C – Grammar

The school will be open on Thursday for you to collect your examination results.

  1. Any results that you can’t collect will be sent home by first class post that afternoon.
  2. Any uncollected results will be sent home by first class post that afternoon.
  3. Any results which aren’t collected would be sent home by first class afternoon post.
  4. Any uncollected results would be dispatched by first class post that afternoon.

If students are unable to collect their results in person, you can collect them for your son.

  1. If someone else is going to be nominated to collect the results, you need to agree it in advance.
  2. If someone else is going to collect your results for you, this needs to be agreed in advance.
  3. If someone else will be nominated to collect the results, this will need to be agreed in advance.
  4. If someone else is nominated to collect the results, this needs to be agreed in advance.

Enrolment onto our Sixth Form courses will take place at the same time.  School staff

  1. is available to assist with queries about post-16 education.
  2. will be available to assist with queries about post-16 education.
  3. will be giving available assistance with queries about post-16 education.
  4. will be available giving assistance with queries about post-16 education.

Any uncollected certificates will be destroyed and you will have to order, and pay for, replacements from the examination boards;

Part 3D – Grammar

  1. I enclose information for Year 10 students about
  2. I enclose information for Year 10 students regarding
  3. Here is some information for Year 10 students regarding
  4. Here is some enclosed information for Year 10 students about

both public and internal examinations.

Students will have an assembly which covers the rules for taking examinations;

  1. they will be given their personal timetable during this.
  2. this is the moment when they will be given their personal timetable.
  3. at this point, personal timetables will be dispatched.
  4. at this point, they will be given their personal timetable.

As well as providing examination information,

  1. it will tell them the room where they should go to
  2. it will tell them the room that they should go to
  3. it will say to them the room that they should go to
  4. it will tell them the room whence they should go

for each examination.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

The Department for Education’s (DfE’s) non-statutory guidance on promoting British values in schools outlines the understanding and knowledge expected of pupils as a result of schools meeting the standard to respect ‘fundamental British values’. These include:

  • An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process
  • An understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law
  • An understanding of the importance of identifying and combating discrimination

It also sets out actions that schools can take to promote British values.

We asked an education expert, Sue Rogers, how subject leaders could show evidence that they are promoting British values in their lessons. She suggested that:

  • Subject leaders should look at the DfE’s list of British values and identify opportunities in their subjects where these values can be demonstrated
  • Teachers could review schemes of work and highlight topics which broadly reflect these values

Schools could look at the following subject-specific approaches:

  • English: Many books will have themes covering tolerance, mutual respect and democracy. Lessons could look at how these themes are presented and how characters embody these values. Poetry, songs and languages from other cultures could also be examined. Lessons could explore the meaning of concepts such as liberty, democracy and tolerance
  • Citizenship: Pupils should be able to understand their personal rights and freedoms, and they should be advised on how to exercise these safely. Pupils should have the opportunity to learn about different models of democracy and take part in votes, pupil voice questionnaires and pupil councils. Topics such as anti-homophobia, equal rights, and e-safety should be taught
  • Religious education (RE): Lessons should reinforce messages of tolerance and respect for others. Children should have the opportunity to visit places of worship that are important to different to faiths. Schools can actively promote diversity through celebrations of different faiths and cultures
  • History and geography: Pupils should analyse events in UK and world history where British values have been tested such as both World Wars. In geography, pupils could look at how different cultures live and work throughout the world

Sue explained that in some subjects, like maths and science, it would be more difficult to demonstrate British values. However, schools should take a holistic approach wherever possible when teaching British values rather than concentrating on individual subjects.

Bill Bolloten, another of our associate experts, agreed with Sue that the curriculum provides many opportunities for discussing and promoting British values. He added that many schools will already be addressing these through subjects such as personal, social, and health education (PSHE) and RE.

In primary schools, the PSHE curriculum may involve discussions about friendship and how we treat our friends. There are natural connections between this and the British values around mutual respect. Schools can use assemblies and collective worship sessions to address how British values are relevant to all pupils.

Bill cautioned schools against creating a separate curriculum strand for British values. As part of SMSC development, British values are not easily ‘taught’. Instead, they need to be lived through the school’s ethos and values. Producing a set curriculum or skills progression risks turning British values into a tick-list of activities rather than a meaningful, character-building part of the work the school does.

He advised that Ofsted will be looking for evidence of how British values ‘flow through’ the school.

Oasis Academy Shirley Park, a primary school in Croydon, identifies how the 5 British values reflect the school’s own values. For example, tolerance for others’ religious beliefs reflect the school’s values of:

  • Kindness
  • Patience
  • Self-control

The British value of ‘mutual respect’ is promoted in English through the use of talk partners and paired reading and in maths through pupils working in pairs or groups.

Gledhow Primary School in Leeds outlines how it promotes British values across the curriculum. It has identified 12 objectives related to British values, linked to curriculum units and learning outcomes.

The promoting British values policy of St Clement’s High School in Norfolk explains British values are promoting during the school’s “super learning days”. For example, cultural diversity is celebrated on one of these days enabling the school to promote the British value of tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs.

Upton Junior School in Kent has outlined how it reinforces British values throughout the school. It says:

  • Democracy is promoted through a pupil council, pupil questionnaires and a rewards system based on pupil votes
  • Visits from authorities such as the police, fire services or lifeguards reinforce the importance of the rule of law
  • The school ethos and behaviour policy revolve around ‘respect’ as a core value, and discussions and assemblies focus on what respect means and how it is shown
  • A ‘language of the term’ subject promotes languages spoken by students for whom English is an additional language. Members of different faiths or religions are also encouraged to share their knowledge and experiences

Part A: 

When embedding British values in a school, which of the following statements are supported in the text?

  1. It is equally easy for every subject area to demonstrate British values.
  2. It is advised that schools should have a general policy to ensure that British values are embedded.
  3. In some subjects in certain schools, it is already likely that there is evidence of British values being promoted.
  4. British values have nothing to do with treatment of friends.
  5. If schools already have core values which reflect British values, then the school will need to amend these so that their core values are separate from British values.
  6. Having visits from people in certain important professions like the police and fire service is important to promote the values of tolerance and respect.
  7. Tick lists should be created to ensure that every British value is adequately covered
  8. Ofsted would expect British values to be evident in a school’s ethos rather than evident in a given lesson.

Part B: 

Read the headings below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide which of the below activities could be used in which lessons in order to demonstrate British values?

E = English / C = Citizenship / RE = Religious education

  1. A mock general election = C
  2. A discussion about why respect should be shown to those who are free from faith = RE
  3. Exploring texts related to themes of tolerance and individual liberty = E

Part C: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Teachers of religious education
  2. Teachers of PSHE – M
  3. Teachers of geography
  4. Teachers of history
  5. Teachers of English
  6. Teachers of maths – L

Part D: 

Select three phrases from the list to complete the statement below.

By promoting British values in schools, pupils are expected to:

  1. Understand that certain British values are protected in law
  2. Discriminate against people who do not respect democracy
  3. Challenge people who hold no faith
  4. Accept that individuals of other faiths and beliefs have should not be met with discrimination
  5. Understand that combating fundamentalism is the most important of the values
  6. Appreciate the concept of democracy
  7. Speak standard English and not use slang
  8. Be more concerned by racism than by homophobia