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Test 2 Solutions

Test 2 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:06:50+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. Intolerance is something all teachers should be challenging in the classroom.
  2. The class were asked to design a miniature version of their model.
  3. The attendance in year 9 was been very positive this year.
  4. There are too many words in the English language that are frequently misspelled.
  5. The boy showed his ignorance by not responding to the teacher’s advice.
  6. The school is not in a good position financially.
  7. The headteacher expects that all data is as accurate as possible.
  8. I have never seen such impressive facilities in a school before.
  9. The introductory lesson is an opportunity to review expectations.
  10. For someone who was only 9 years of age, he spoke very eloquently.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Sex and Relationships Education

sex and Relationships Education (SRE policy

The education Act 1996 has consolidated all previous legislation

The sex education elements are mandatory for all students of primary and secondary school age these cover anatomy puberty, biological aspects of sexual reproduction and use of hormones to control and promote fertility

Secondary schools are required to provide an SRE programme which includes as a minimum) information about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV / AIDS.

Other elements of personal, social and health and citizenship education (PSHCE) including SRE are nonstatutory. All schools must provide and make available for inspection an up to date policy describing the content and organisation of SRE outside of national curriculum science

Answers: 

Sex and Relationships Education

Sex and Relationships Education (SRE) policy

The Education Act 1996 has consolidated all previous legislation.

The sex education elements are mandatory for all students of primary and secondary school age. These cover anatomy, puberty, biological aspects of sexual reproduction and use of hormones to control and promote fertility.

Secondary schools are required to provide an SRE programme which includes (as a minimum) information about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV / AIDS.

Other elements of personal, social and health and citizenship education (PSHCE), including SRE, are non-statutory. All schools must provide, and make available for inspection, an up to date policy describing the content and organisation of SRE outside of national curriculum science.

Part 3A – Grammar

  1. there assessed practical sessions will be held on the following dates:
  2. their assessed practical sessions will be held on the following dates:
  3. their assessed practical sessions will be held on the dates coming up:
  4. there assessed practical sessions, will be held on the dates below.

If there are any issues

  1. students might come and see me as immediately as they can.
  2. students may come and see me as immediately as possible.
  3. students must come and see me as soon as possible.
  4. students should really quickly come and see me.

I would be extremely grateful if all students do their best to attend,

  1. as it will put them in a position to complete their good work in a timely manner.
  2. as it will put them in a good position to complete their work in a timely manner.
  3. as it will put them in a good position to complete their work in good
  4. as it will put them in a timely position to complete their work in a good manner.

Part 3B – Grammar

For a period of time now we have been

  1. looking at ways for which we can
  2. looking at ways by which we can
  3. looking at ways with which we can
  4. looking at ways in which we can

further improve our already strong pastoral systems.

Pastoral support needs in schools have changed significantly in previous years and many schools across the country

  1. were moving to different model’s of staffing.
  2. have been moving to different staff models.
  3. were moving to different models’ of staffing.
  4. have been moving to different staffing models.

Following a period of

  1. consulting the school, and listening to feedback from students, staff and parents,
  2. consultation in the school, and listening to feedback from students, staff and parents,
  3. consulting in the school, and listening to feedback from student’s and staff and parents,
  4. consultation in the school, and hearing feedback from students, staff and parents’,

we are now in a position to move ahead with changes.

Part 3C – Grammar

  1. I wish to bring to your attention the arrangements
  2. I wish to bring your attention towards the arrangements
  3. I wish to stand your attention to the arrangements
  4. I wish to make you attentive of the arrangements

for the last day of the Autumn Term.

Any student who normally

  1. is taking a Free School Meal may be
  2. wants a Free School Meal may be
  3. takes a Free School Meal will be
  4. is wanting a Free School Meal will be

welcome to book a packed lunch.

In the spring term, there will be

  1. an continuing focus on uniform, with a particular emphasis on correct trousers and appropriate skirt length.
  2. a continued focus on uniform, with a particular emphasis on correct trousers and appropriate skirt length.
  3. a continued focus on uniform, with an focused emphasis on correct trousers and skirt length.

a continued focus on uniform, emphasising appropriate trousers length and skirt length.

Part 3D – Grammar

Our new Pastoral House Managers will take the lead on most of the day to day aspects of the pastoral care

  1. and will be a key point of contact for students and home alike.
  2. and would be a key contact point for students and home alike.
  3. and will be a key point of contact for likely students and home.
  4. and shall be a key point of contact for likeable students and home.

As a school,

  1. we are consciencious that we do not want this change to unsettle students in any way,
  2. we are conscious that we do not want this change to unsettle students in anyway,
  3. we are conscious that we do not want this change to unsettle students in any way,
  4. we are consciencious that we do not want a change to unsettle students in any way,

and will ensure that students are aware of who they can seek help from in school.

We will also ensure that for those students currently receiving support

  1. that there is a thorough handover where a change of staff effects them.
  2. that there is a through handover where a change of staff. affects them
  3. that there is a through handover where a staffing change. effects them

that there is a thorough handover where a staffing change  affects them.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text
Can you use a slide rule? Can you edit a video? These were two of the questions that came to me when I heard news of anxious debate over the fact that some schools were switching to digital clocks in exam halls because “teenagers cannot tell the time”.

The story came about after comments from a former headteacher, Malcolm Trobe, said “the current generation aren’t as good at reading the traditional clock face as older generations”. To help minimise stress in important exams, he has suggested switching to digital clocks.

As a maths teacher and a parent, I know that one of the requirements in the key stage 1 curriculum is for children to be taught how to read a traditional clock face. On questioning friends, teachers and students, I found few don’t achieve this. That older students might be finding calculating the time they have left in exams difficult is thus more likely about practice. For most pupils – and adults too – digital displays are simply more common, whether on train platforms, computer screens or mobile phones.

Trobe’s comments don’t appear to be backed up by any large-scale study, so I will offer the results of my own, rather unscientific, survey: although a couple got the time wrong before correcting themselves, all the teenagers I spoke to were able to read an analogue clock perfectly well. However, for many this wasn’t an embedded reflex – doing so required a level of thought akin to performing a calculation. They get there, but they have to think about it.
It therefore seems sensible for Trobe to suggest that, when students are meant to be focusing all their thinking on answering exam questions, they are shown the time in the way they are most familiar with.

However, this still leaves us with the deeper question as to why this change in timekeeping technology has caused such a furore. Nobody is suggesting that children have no idea what time is; the sense of outrage seems to be because the devices children are using aren’t the ones in common use 40 years ago.
I experienced the same exasperation when I was at school and my maths teacher discovered that none of us could use a slide rule. I remember the sneering dismissal of us as hopelessly stupid, the sigh that worried what the world was coming to.

In fact, when taught, we picked up the method quickly enough and enjoyed the nostalgic feel of using an “old” tool. But did we deem it a necessary skill to master and put to daily use? No.

This is what gave rise to my questions. How many of those now huffing about pupils so dim they can’t read a clock face could themselves still calculate in pre-decimal currency, use an abacus, or calculate their longitude using a sextant? All these once-essential skills have fallen into disuse not because we have become more stupid, but because our tools have become more sophisticated.
I also wonder if those complaining would be able to throw together a film with fades, dissolves and subtitles. All my students are fluent with such tools, which leave many of their parents looking rather dull in comparison.
Outrage at the apparent stupidity of millennials and the generations following them has become a trope for certain sections of the press, one that is crass and offensive. As GCSE season arrives I can’t help but think that this storm over clock faces is an early shot in the annual “exams are getting easier” vein.
We have been here before. Indignation over such technological change is a generational shibboleth, a means of testing membership of the “proper” world as certain privileged adults have labelled it.

Rather than perpetuating a tired struggle about which technologies signify this proper intelligence in those coming after us, what we should celebrate instead is the extraordinary proficiency that our young people are developing with suites of tools so sophisticated they make telling the time seem like child’s play.

Part A: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. Switching from analogue to digital clocks in an examination hall would be a good idea
  2. It is crucial that pupils learn how to tell the time using a traditional clock face
  3. Students are able to tell the time using a traditional clock face, but they work it out like it was a maths problem
  4. Students only appreciate learning things which are current because there is no place for out of date skills
  5. Students are also being taught how to use a slide rule and edit a video recorder
  6. The fact that skills which we used to deem as essential are not valued by the current generation does not make them any less intelligent
  7. There are almost no skills that students have which their parents do not have
  8. The press as a whole believe that millennials are stupid, and their inability to tell the time provides them with more ammunition

Part B: 

Drag and drop the appropriate heading for each paragraph:

Keeping up with the times

Analogue time outdated

Capable but not proficient

Paragraph 1 – Analogue time outdated

Paragraph 2 – Capable but not proficient

Paragraph 3 – Keeping up with the times

Part C: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Parents
  2. Social workers
  3. Classroom teachers in general
  4. PGCE students
  5. Universities – L
  6. The general public – M

Part D: 

Select three most appropriate titles for this article:

  1. AM or PM? Children don’t know the difference
  2. Should we call time on analogue clocks?
  3. Why can’t children tell them time?
  4. Children stressed in exams due to time confusion
  5. Modern era
  6. No cause for concern over children unable to tell analogue time
  7. Clocks further evidence that children are becoming less intelligent
  8. Analogue replaced by digital in exam halls due to student confusion
  9. Children late to the exam hall because they can’t tell the time