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Test 3 Solutions

Test 3 Solutions 2019-04-05T10:16:54+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. The boy has demonstrated continuous progress in history since year 7.
  2. He was undoubtedly the best at maths in his class.
  3. The school was badly affected by the latest budget cuts.
  4. We have a campaign in the school to eradicate bullying.
  5. The student was told not to deceive his parents.
  6. Mr Taylor was the most indispensable member of the school’s staff.
  7. We read of grievous complaints of injustice in the education system.
  8. The headteacher expressed his dissatisfaction at the poor examination results.
  9. Girls always appear to be more enthusiastic than boys in Spanish lessons.
  10. The teacher asked the group if the shape was symmetrical.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Sex and relationships education to be compulsory in all schools.

All children from the age of 4 will be taught about safe and healthy relationships, the education secretary, Ms Greening, is expected to say

All children, from the age of 4 upwards, will be taught about safe and healthy relationships, the education secretary, will tell parliament children will also be taught at an appropriate age about sex

Until now, basic sexeducation limited to teaching children about sex in biology lessons – has been compulsory only in schools run by local authorities. Academies and free schools which are not under local authority control, are not obliged to teach the subject.

The new changes – to be announced in a written statement from ms Greening – will represent the biggest overhaul of sex and relationships education in 17 years.

Tackling “sexting

The curriculum is expected to include issues such as online safety sexting and consent it will also tackle domestic abuse and sexual harassment

Answers: 

Sex and relationships education to be compulsory in all schools.

All children, from the age of 4 will be taught about safe and healthy relationships, the education secretary, Ms Greening, is expected to say.

All children, from the age of 4 upwards, will be taught about safe and healthy relationships, the education secretary, will tell Parliament. Children will also be taught, at an appropriate age, about sex.

Until now, basic sex-education limited to teaching children about sex in biology lessons – has been compulsory only in schools run by local authorities. Academies and free schools, which are not under local authority control, are not obliged to teach the subject.

The new changes – to be announced in a written statement from Ms Greening – will represent the biggest overhaul of sex and relationships education in 17 years.

Tackling “sexting”

The curriculum is expected to include issues such as online safety, sexting and consent. It will also tackle domestic abuse and sexual harassment.

Part 3A – Grammar

On Friday, we will hold our Year 13 Leavers’ Assembly

  1. to commemorate students’ time in a student-led celebration
  2. in remembrance of student’s time in a student-led celebration
  3. to commemorate students’ time in a celebration led by the students’
  4. to remember students time in a student-led celebration

Following the assembly, students

  1. must attend lessons as normally.
  2. must normally attend lessons.
  3. should go back to their usual lessons they attend.
  4. will be required to attend lessons as normal.

Study leave for Year 13 students commences on Monday 5 June. However, we recognise that many students would benefit from

  1. formal revision, informal tutorial support, or an opportunity to seek advice from they’re teachers.
  2. formal revision, informal tutorial support, or an opportunity to seek advice from their teachers.
  3. formal and informal revision and tutorial support, or an opportunity to seek advice from there teachers.
  4. formal revision, informal tutorial support, or an opportunity to get advise from their teachers.

Part 3B – Grammar

We will be holding our annual Sports Day at Greenford Athletics track on Friday 23 June.

  1. To insure smooth running of the day,
  2. To ensure that the day goes good ,
  3. To ensure smooth running of the day,
  4. For insurance of a smooth running day,

it is crucial that parents and students are aware of how the day will be organised.

All students

  1. across Years 7-10 will participate in a range of track and field athletic events.
  2. from inside Years 7-10 will participate in a range of track and field athletic events.
  3. across Years 7-10 will show participation in a range of track and field athletic events.
  4. in Years 7-10 are going to show participation in a range of track and field athletic events.

Since there is no café at the track,

  1. all students are suggested to bring a healthy packed lunch with sufficient water for the day.
  2. all students are advised to bring a healthy packed lunch with sufficient water for the day.
  3. all students are adviced to bring sufficient packed lunch with water for the day.

all students have an obligation to bring a healthy packed lunches with sufficient water for the day.

Part 3C – Grammar

Dear Parent/Carer,

I am pleased to inform you that the Summer Ball will be held in July.

  1. Following the eventual success in previous years,
  2. Following the success of this event in previous years,
  3. , Following the successfulness of this event previously,
  4. Due to a recent success of this event in previous years,

we are delighted to welcome students from Leeds High to this celebration.

Tickets will be on sale online and will cost £17.50.  The school

  1. no longer accepts cash or cheques; tickets must be purchased via our online payment system.
  2. isn’t taking cash or cheques; tickets must be purchased via our online payment system.
  3. will not accept cash or cheques resulting intickets must be purchased via our online payment system.
  4. isn’t accepting cash or cheques anymorein payment of purchases; tickets must be bought via our online payment system.

Students are also able to purchase a ticket for a guest who must be

  1. between the ages of 16-19 years and should bring
  2. between 16-19 years old and ought to bring
  3. between the ages of 16-19 years and will need
  4. between 16-19 years of age and will need to bring

photographic identification.

Part 3D – Grammar

Dear Parent/Carer,

  1. Because last year s’Harvest Challenge appeal was so successful,
  2. Following the enormous success of last year’s Harvest Challenge appeal,
  3. As a result of a last year’s Harvest Challenge appeal being successful,
  4. Following a big success in the Harvest Challenges appeal last year,

we are launching this year’s Harvest Challenge.

The aim of the Harvest Challenge is to:

  1. get quickly some much-needed food to the foodbanks which offer emergency, non-perishable food to individuals and families in crisis.
  2. provide much-needed food to the foodbanks which offer emergency, non-perishable food to individuals and families in crisis.
  3. provide much-needed food to the foodbanks which offer emergency, non-perishable food to individuals and crisis’ families.
  4. provide food to the foodbanks which offer emergency, non-perishable food to much-needed individuals and families in crisis.

Both food and monetary donations

  1. made by the boys will be collected by their form tutors and house captains
  1. given by the boys will be collected by there form tutors and house captains
  2. given by the boys are collected by both form tutors and house captains
  1. made by the boys are collected by their form tutors and house captains

on the days specified.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

After the shock results of the key stage 2 reading test last year, there is barely a primary school in the country that hasn’t prioritised reading this year. There are many creative ways of encouraging not only a love of reading, but a high level of competence in the subject. You’ll have your own, of course, but here’s a reminder of some of the basics that a good reading scheme can’t do without.

Reading is rarely collaborative. So, whether preparing children for tests or not, we need to set them up to be independent readers – for future schooling and for their own pleasure. The amount of time students spend in independent reading is the best predictor of reading achievement. However, children shouldn’t spend endless amounts of time reading without purpose; all reading in the classroom should be purposeful and lead to one of the following activities.

In real life, our comprehension of a text is rarely verbalised, let alone written down. But tests that require written answers to comprehension questions are embedded in our education system. We must prepare children to answer these well, so that they can show their levels of understanding.

Reading aloud allows children to access high level texts, enables them to hear how unfamiliar language and sentence structures should sound and is proven to aid comprehension of a text; teachers should regularly read aloud to children. The Teachers as Readers project also found that hearing books read aloud gave children a model for their own independent reading. Children also benefit from opportunities to read aloud themselves.

‘Book talk’ – where an adult models a reader’s thoughts and encourages children to do the same – can be the most enjoyable part of a reading lesson. If children have already independently given written responses to questions, a discussion will provide them with the opportunity to add to or edit their answers. This should also lead to the teacher giving model answers to questions, either verbally or in writing.

Effective questioning has a very important role to play in reading lessons, not only as part of whole-class or group discussions, but on a one-to-one basis. If a child asks a question, a skilful teacher will ask a question in return and refer the child back to the text, rather than instantly providing a model answer. Many pre-made comprehension activities do not have clearly-written questions so the ability to write unambiguous, bespoke comprehension questions is also a must.

Having a good vocabulary is the gateway to understanding – if we don’t understand the words we read, then we can’t understand a text. The 2016 KS2 test specifically tested vocabulary, so we need to provide children with opportunities to hone skills such as morphemic and contextual analysis. It’s also a good idea to explicitly teach unfamiliar words before children encounter them in the text.

Prioritising reading on the timetable will give you plenty of time to provide the children with a vast range of text types. Within one lesson you might only look at two linked texts, but over time you should ensure that children read widely. Anything with printed or spoken words, films and pictures are all fair game for a reading lesson. Pairing a fiction and a non-fiction text can increase understanding of the fiction text and give more contexts for the non-fiction text. It’s also a great way to provide opportunities for discussion of other issues, from world affairs to grammar and punctuation use.

Don’t just ask random questions, have random discussions or use random texts ─ be deliberate. Ask: “What particular reading skill do I want the children to work on today?” and design all the elements of the lesson around this. It seems obvious, but many reading lessons are based on answering whatever questions spring to mind. Instead, teachers should read the text and look for opportunities to teach, for example, inference skills, or vocabulary skills.

Even the most finely-crafted reading lesson will miss the mark if the teacher is not enthusiastic about reading. All this will come more naturally to someone who reads and understands books themselves. The Teachers as Readers project revealed that teachers who were readers “made a positive impact on children’s desire to read and frequency of reading at home and at school” and showed that attainment was positively impacted as a result.

Part A: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

Implied

Supported

No evidence

  1. Children with poor vocabulary are likely to have difficulties accessing certain texts in lessons. — Implied
  2. The role of the school is to foster a positive reading culture, not only so that pupils achieve at school, but also to ensure that they will continue to read for fun once they are adults. — Supported
  3. Children should read a variety of different materials, but reading fiction is vital as it allows children to build up an imagination which will help them with their creative writing. — No evidence

Part B: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Head teachers of secondary schools
  2. Head teachers of primary schools
  3. Teachers of English
  4. Primary school teachers – M
  5. Parents
  6. Universities – L

Part C: 

Select three most appropriate titles for this article:

  1. Lack of teacher skill leading to lower literacy levels
  2. Life success founded in children’s reading ability
  3. How do you teach children to read?
  4. Reading arguably more important than maths, say experts
  5. What you can do as a parent to improve your child’s literacy
  6. How do you foster a love of reading?
  7. The essential components of a KS2 reading scheme
  8. English teachers at fault for literacy crisis

Part D: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. The ways in which a teacher can encourage a love of reading are rather limited
  2. Most of the time, reading is done on one’s own
  3. When teachers read aloud, they should deliberately mispronounce words so that students can hear mistakes
  4. Learning opportunities arise when children are given the opportunity to read aloud themselves
  5. A model answer should immediately be provided when a child answers a teacher’s question incorrectly
  6. Reading doesn’t have to be made a priority in lessons if reading is done regularly at home
  7. The enthusiasm a teacher displays in a lesson does not usually have an impact on reading outcomes
  8. Teachers should always plan reading comprehension questions, rather than invent them on the spot