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Test 5 Solutions

Test 5 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:12:45+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. This boy displays particularly challenging behaviour.
  2. The pupil needs to take his medicine every break time.
  3. We heard a mysterious noise from outside the classroom.
  4. My only criticism about his lesson was that here was no challenge for the more able pupils.
  5. I am jealous of your timetable this year!
  6. The teacher’s comments in the staff meeting were completely unnecessary.
  7. We need to appoint a few more permanent members of staff.
  8. The class was taken to the local leisure centre for swimming lessons.
  9. Some of the content of the assembly was completely irrelevant.
  10. Staff morale needs to be improved immediately.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Exclusive: Mocks cramming, revision guides exam culture now starts with Sats in Year 2

Some 62 per cent of primary schools hold mock key stage 1 Sats for seven-year-olds a new survey by Tes with the NEU teaching union suggests.

In the poll 30 per cent of teachers said that their schools asked Year 2 children to revise for Sats at home, and one in five schools have been sending their Year 2 pupils home with practice Sats papers

I live in fear of being moved to Year 2, as I disagree with the way Sats have taken over and completely ruined Year 2,” one teacher said in response to the survey

More than 650,000 Year 2 children will sit the tests in maths and reading at some point next month there is also a nonstatutory test in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

The test results themselves are not reported, but they are used to feed into the statutory teacher assessments of childrens reading and maths

But since a new, tougher national curriculum was introduced in 2014, with a corresponding rise in the demands of the tests, teachers say the pressure has increased noticeably

Answers: 

Exclusive: Mocks, cramming, revision guides, exam culture now starts with Sats in Year 2

Some 62 per cent of primary schools hold mock key stage 1 Sats for seven-year-olds, a new survey by Tes, with the NEU teaching union, suggests.

In the poll, 30 per cent of teachers said that their schools asked Year 2 children to revise for Sats at home, and one in five schools have been sending their Year 2 pupils home with practice Sats papers.

“I live in fear of being moved to Year 2, as I disagree with the way Sats have taken over and completely ruined Year 2,” one teacher said in response to the survey.

More than 650,000 Year 2 children will sit the tests in maths and reading at some point next month. There is also a non-statutory test in spelling, punctuation and grammar.

The test results themselves are not reported, but they are used to feed into the statutory teacher assessments of children’s reading and maths.

But since a new, tougher national curriculum was introduced in 2014, with a corresponding rise in the demands of the tests, teachers say the pressure has increased noticeably.

Part 3A – Grammar

Dear Parent/Carer,

The school always tries to work closely with our community to ensure that issues that may

  1. affect our students and local residents are resolved in a mutually beneficial way.
  2. effect our students and local residents are resolved in a beneficially mutual way.
  3. affect our students and local residents are resolved in a beneficially mutual way.
  4. effect our students and local residents are resolved in a mutually beneficial way.

With this in mind,

  1. we have had several incidents reported recently
  2. we had several incidents reported recently
  3. we will have had several incidents reported recently
  4. we would have had several incidents reported recently

concerning problematic parking in and around school.

It is important that positive relations with our local community remain in place

  1. and do not diminish because parking causes problems for local residents.
  2. and do not extinguish due to parking that could cause problems for local residents
  3. and do not diminish due to parking that could cause problems for local residents
  4. and do not diminish due to parking that will cause problems for local residents

Part 3B – Grammar

We would like to invite you to our Y11 Information Evening.  This information

  1. will last for approximately an hour and there will be members of the Senior Team around and about.
  2. will last for about an hour and their will be members of the Senior Team on hand.
  3. will last for approximately an hour and there will be members of the Senior Team available.
  4. will last for about an hour and there are members of the Senior Team in the vicinity.

We will run through an outline of the calendar for the year.

We will also talk through

  1. exams, curriculum, our expectations of student’s for the year,
  2. exams and curriculum, the students’ expectations for the year,
  3. exams, curriculum, our annual expectations of students’,
  4. exams and curriculum, our expectations of students for the year,

and also how you can support from home.

Following this there will be a short meeting for

  1. students of parents attending the Belgium trip.
  2. parents of students attending the Belgium trip.
  3. parents’ students attending the Belgium trip.
  4. students’ parents attending the Belgium trip.

Part 3C – Grammar

We are organising an exchange visit for students in Years 8. This is an exciting opportunity for

  1. students to practise their language skills and for learning more
  2. students to practise their language skills and learn more
  3. students practicing their language skills and learning more
  4. students to practice their language skills and learn more

about French life and culture.

Students will

  1. stay with a French family, have a short taste of French school life and meeting as a group each day.
  2. stay with a French family and have a short taste of French school life and meet as a group each day.
  3. stay with a French family, have a short taste of French school life and have met daily as a group.
  4. stay with a French family, have a short taste of French school life and meet as a group each day.

All students who have participated in the trips

  1. have been delighted with the warm welcome they have received.
  2. have been delighted with the warm welcome they received.
  3. were delighted with the warm welcome they have received.
  4. would have been delighted with the warm welcome they received.

Part 3D – Grammar

  1. We made a possible booking
  2. We have made a potential booking
  3. We have made a provisional booking
  4. We made a provincial booking

for the first week in Easter 2018 to go to the ski resort of Alpe d’Huez.

With 7 different ski areas to choose from, the resort of Alpe d’Huez

  1. is one of the locations for top school ski groups.
  2. is one of the school ski group’s top locations.
  3. is one of the school ski groups’ top locations.
  4. is one of the top locations for school ski groups.

The wide range of beginner slopes provides the ideal learning platform

  1. in order to develop confidence on the snow before moving to intermediate runs.
  2. for developing confidence on the snow and moving to intermediate runs.
  3. for developing confidence on the snow then moving to intermediate runs.
  4. to develop confidence on the snow before moving to intermediate runs.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

Employers are confused by the new GCSE grading system as a quarter think the bottom grade is the best mark, a survey has found.

More than one in five employers incorrectly thought that 1 was the top grade, according to a new report published by the exams watchdog.

Ofqual commissioned a YouGov survey of 2,974 employers, universities, school leaders, parents, teachers and members of the general public to ask about perceptions of GCSEs and A levels.

Some 23 per cent of employers wrongly believed that 1 was the top grade, compared with 64 per cent who correctly stated that 9 was.
Eight per cent of universities also thought that 1 was the top grade, along with six per cent of headteachers, the poll found. The proportion rose to 16 per cent among parents.

Last summer, students received their marks for GCSEs for the first time under the new numerical system which uses grades one to nine, rather than from A* to G.

The numerical grades were designed by former Education Secretary Michael Gove as part of a package of reforms to toughen up syllabuses and to counter grade inflation at the top end, since A and A* are split between seven, eight and nine.

Almost a third (31 per cent) of employers, and 15 per cent of universities said they were unaware of the new grade 9 to 1 system.

Michelle Meadows, deputy chief regulator at Ofqual, said: “We recognise the need to continue to engage with stakeholders as reforms bed in.

“To that end, we have launched new films and other resources related to GCSE science ahead of this summer’s exam series and will be doing more to explain other aspects of the reform programme in the months ahead.”

The Institute of Directors has previously warned that the new grading system is “gibberish” and will cost students jobs.

Seamus Nevin, head of employment and skills policy at the Institute of Directors, which represents leaders of British business, said that many employers will only discover that the GCSEs have changed once they begin receiving CVs from pupils.

“They might think, ‘What is this gibberish and what does it mean and how has it changed from previous grading systems?'” he has said.

“If the employer is time-poor and resource-constrained then they can, on occasions, be quite keen to get through as many [CVs] as possible. So if they have a CV that they don’t understand then they might opt for the ones that they do.”

Last year, pupils were marked under the new system for English Literature, English Language and Maths, while the rest of their subjects will be given the old A* to G grades. This summer, another 20 subjects will have 9 to 1 grading in 2018, with most others following in 2019.

Part A: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

Explicitly contradicted

Supported

No evidence

  1. Job applicants with GCSE qualifications graded under the new numerical grading system may be unfairly penalised by employers if there are other applicants with GCSEs graded under the A – G grading system.

Supported

  1. The majority of employers are not even aware that a grade 1 is the worst possible grade.

Explicitly contradicted

  1. The move from the A* – G system to the new numerical grading system will result in more British pupils attaining places at prestigious universities.

No evidence

Part B: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Head teachers
  2. Classroom teachers in general
  3. People generally interested in education – M
  4. Parents and carers
  5. Heads of maths departments – L
  6. Universities

Part C: 

Select three appropriate titles for this article:

  1. Confusion with new GCSE grading system
  2. New GCSE grading system largely a success
  3. Numerical grades: Are you having a laugh?
  4. New GCSE grading system only understood by Ofsted
  5. Michael Gove’s new GCSE reforms
  6. Employers confused by new GCSE as a quarter think bottom grade is the best mark
  7. Politicians slowly becoming fluent with the new GCSE numerical grading system
  8. New GCSE grading system ill-thought-out

Part D: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. Most employers are unaware of the new numerical grading system
  2. The numerical grading system was introduced to make the curriculum more robust
  3. The new numerical grading system does not have the backing of The Institute of Directors
  4. Employers will understand applicants’ CVs which detail GCSEs qualifications graded from 1 – 9
  5. In the future, employers will prefer to see CVs with numerical grades
  6. Even people working in the education sector seem to have struggled to come to terms with the new numerical grading system
  7. The new numerical grading system does not affect high-attaining students
  8. Parents have less understanding of the new grading system than employers do