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Test 6 Solutions

Test 6 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:14:25+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. His possessions were stolen from the changing rooms.
  2. The pupil’s progress has been inadequate.
  3. There are so many good resources for planning lessons on the TES.
  4. It is genuinely a privilege to teach a group like this.
  5. Jack’s presence in the class has a negative influence on the class as a whole.
  6. The positive changes in Jessica’s attitude are very noticeable.
  7. The procedure is to issue three warnings before removing a child from a lesson.
  8. All correspondence for the Spanish trip should be sent to the headteacher’s PA for approval.
  9. The schedule for the field trip has not yet been finalised.
  10. The boy was badly tackled and lay in the ground unconscious.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Ofsted Schools are overreliant on meaningless data.

An ofsted director has said there is too much reliance on meaningless data in the education system.

Sean Harford, the inspectorates national director of education has said inspectors do not need to see lots of data, spreadsheets graphs and charts about how children are performing

His comments follow a recent poll which suggested that some Ofsted inspectors were adding to headteachers workloads by asking for information that they are not supposed to request.

In a new blog mr Harford also reiterated that Ofsted does not want to see a specific amount frequency or type of marking.

He said he had been asked on twitter what was the biggest flaw in assessment in this country.

“I think there is too much marking being expected compared with the resultant benefits to pupils learning too much reliance on meaningless data and too little meaningful assessment of the right things at the right point in the curriculum” Mr Harford said.

Answers: 

Ofsted: Schools are overreliant on meaningless data.

An Ofsted director has said there is too much reliance on meaningless data in the education system.

Sean Harford, the inspectorate’s national director of education, has said inspectors do not need to see lots of data, spreadsheets, graphs and charts about how children are performing.

His comments follow a recent poll which suggested that some Ofsted inspectors were adding to headteachers’ workloads by asking for information that they are not supposed to request.

In a new blog, Mr Harford also reiterated that Ofsted does not want to see a specific amount, frequency or type of marking.

He said he had been asked on Twitter what was the biggest flaw in assessment in this country.

“I think there is too much marking being expected compared with the resultant benefits to pupils’ learning, too much reliance on meaningless data, and too little meaningful assessment of the right things at the right point in the curriculum.” Mr Harford said.

Part 3A – Grammar

There will be an information evening for students on Tuesday for the upcoming trip to Washington.  The meeting

  1. will last no longer than one hour.
  2. will last one hour at the most.
  3. will last maximum one hour.
  4. will last no longer than one hour.

At the meeting, I will be going over final arrangements for the trip

  1. and hand out out relevant documents.
  2. and handing out relevant documents.
  3. and will hand out relevant documents.
  4. And going to hand out relevant documents.
  1. It will also provide an opportunity for students and parents
  2. It will also be an opportunity for students and parents
  3. It also provides an opportunity for students’ and parents
  4. It would also be an opportunity for students and parents

to ask any questions.

Part 3B – Grammar

In Year 8 all students study: RE, English, maths, science, one language, DT, PE  art, music, computing, geography and history.

In addition, for the remaining 2 hours per week,

  1. we will like to give your child an opportunity
  2. we would like to provide your child with the opportunity
  3. we would like to provide a chance for your child
  4. we would like to give the opportunities to your child

to study a second modern foreign language in Year 8 and Year 9.

This is an offer that has been in place for the last few years and

  1. allows our students the benifit of
  2. allows our students to benefit by
  3. allows our students to benefit from
  4. allows our students to benefit with

experiencing two languages.

We recognise that for some students,

  1. this may not be the most appropriate pathway.
  2. this won’tbe the most appropriate pathway.
  3. this might not be the most appropriate pathway.
  4. this could not be the most appropriate pathway.

Part 3C – Grammar

Dear Parent/Guardian

As you are aware,

  1. all Year 10 students do study
  2. all Year 10 students must be studying
  1. all Year 10 students are required to study
  2. all Year 10 students are obligated to study

texts for their English Literature GCSE.

It is recommended that students have their own copies of the text

  1. so that they are able to annotate them in class and refer to these notes
  2. so that they are able to annotate them in class and are referring to these notes
  1. so that they are able to annotate them in class and will be referring to these notes
  1. so that they are able to annotate them in class and should refer to these notes

as part of their revision at the end of Year 11.

If you wish to purchase copies through school, please return the reply slip below

  1. and indicate your choosen requirements and method of payment.
  2. indicating your requirements and choosen method of payment.
  3. indicating your requirements and chosen method of payment.

indicating your chosen requirements and methods of payment.

Part 3D – Grammar

We are hoping to take all A2 students to the University of York. The Biology Department at the University

  1. have kindly made agreement to host a session
  2. has made a kind agreement to host a session
  3. have agreed kindly to host a session
  4. has kindly agreed to host a session

on DNA fingerprinting.

  1. As DNA technology makes up a large part
  2. As DNA technology consumes a large part
  3. As DNA technology is forming a big part
  4. As DNA technology makes up a huge piece

of the exam in the summer, we feel this is a valuable opportunity not to be missed.

  1. To enable student attendance, the following slip will need to be signed and returned
  2. In order to enable students to attend, the following slip will need to be signed and returned
  3. To enable students to attend, the following slip will need to be signed and will need to be returned
  4. To enable students to attend, the following slip will need to be signed and returned

to the school office by Wednesday 21 March.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

England would have to double the number of disadvantaged pupils achieving top GCSE grades in maths to match some of the best countries in the world, a new report has found.

The country is in the bottom half of developed nations for the attainment gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers in maths, analysis from thinktank Education Policy Institute (EPI) and UCL Institute of Education (IOE) academics has revealed.

The gap between disadvantaged pupils in England – children eligible for free school meals – and their peers is equivalent to one whole maths GCSE grade, placing them at 27th out of 44 nations.

Just one in 10 disadvantaged pupils in England achieve the top GCSE grades in maths, while nearly twice as many disadvantaged pupils in Singapore achieve these top grades.
The report concludes that the countries that achieve both high academic performance and equity between pupils from different backgrounds tend to avoid selection by ability, streaming and setting – and they have a significant focus on attracting and retaining high quality teachers.

Natalie Perera, report co-author and executive director of the EPI, said: “This report provides a reality-check on educational equality in England.
“If we wish to improve on these measures and ensure our school system works for pupils of all backgrounds, learning from the experiences of these nations is essential.”
Mary Bousted, joint general secretary of the National Education Union (NEU), said: “This report confirms that the government’s education reform programme has failed some of our most disadvantaged learners. This should be a national scandal and education ministers should be ashamed of their record.”

She added: “The government’s inability to confront the harmful practice of ability grouping, coupled with its desire to further expand selective schools, will exacerbate the challenges highlighted in this report and further entrench educational disadvantage.”

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said: “We have to improve outcomes for disadvantaged students, and the greatest barrier in doing so is teacher shortages, which are particularly acute in schools with high levels of disadvantage because these schools often face the greatest recruitment challenges.

“It cannot be a coincidence that maths outcomes for disadvantaged pupils are the most concerning finding in this report given that teacher shortages are very severe in this subject.”

He added: “The government must do more to ensure they have the vital resources of teachers and funding – both of which are in desperately short supply.”
A separate report from charity Sutton Trust found that more than a fifth of teachers and school leaders believe funding for the poorest youngsters is being used to plug holes in school budgets.

Among the senior leaders polled, 24 per cent said pupil premium funding – extra money to support disadvantaged youngsters – was being used elsewhere, up from 30 per cent last year.

A Department for Education spokesperson said: “Thanks to our reforms and the hard work of teachers, we are seeing real improvements in English schools – and this report confirms the progress that is being made to raise standards.

“There are now 1.9 million more children in good or outstanding schools than in 2010, our GCSE and A-levels rank among the world’s best qualifications and the attainment gap between disadvantaged children and their peers has narrowed at GCSE and Key Stage 2.

“But there is always more to do – that’s why our Social Mobility Action Plan set out measures to drive improvements in key skills including numeracy, targets areas that need the most support through our £72m Opportunity Areas programme and builds on the almost £2.5bn we provide each year to schools to help raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils.”

Part A: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

Explicitly contradicted

Supported

Implied

  1. All pupil premium funding which schools receive for disadvantaged children is always correctly allocated.

Explicitly contradicted

  1. The British government needs to stop practices which are causing educational disadvantage, such as setting pupils according to ability.

Supported

  1. Teachers tend not to want to work in schools where there are large numbers of disadvantaged pupils.

Implied

Part B: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Head teachers of secondary schools
  2. PGCE students
  3. Teachers in the United Kingdom
  4. Teachers in Singapore – L
  5. Teachers of citizenship
  6. Politicians – M

Part C: 

Select three most appropriate titles for this article:

  1. Dearth of maths teachers in the UK
  2. Report find that poorer pupils in England are a whole GCSE grade behind their peers in maths
  3. Pupils receiving free school meals making better progress in maths
  4. Only 10% of disadvantaged pupils attaining top grades in maths in the UK
  5. Setting by ability is widening the gap
  6. Education Minister claims attainment of disadvantaged pupils is improving
  7. UK in bottom half of table for gap between rich and poor in maths
  8. Social Mobility Action Plan in disarray

Part D: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. One of the key things the government needs to address in England in order to narrow the gap between advantaged and disadvantaged pupils is to attract more teachers to the profession
  2. In England, disadvantaged pupils are on average a grade lower in all subjects
  3. The spokesman from the Department for Education was largely in agreement with comments made by the NEU and the ASCL
  4. In England, maths is the subject where the teacher shortage is most keenly felt
  5. Selective schools have been created so that disadvantaged children receive more attention in state schools
  6. We can close the gap between advantaged and disadvantaged pupils by trying to attract teachers from Singapore
  7. In Singapore, pupils are not set according to ability
  8. Nearly half of disadvantaged children in Singapore attain a top grade in maths