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Test 7 Solutions

Test 7 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:17:48+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. The amount of mistakes in the essay was excessive.
  2. Bob needs to specifically focus on improving his spelling in English.
  3. It is regrettable that your son has been involved in an incident of this nature.
  4. It seems suspicious that Gary was absent on the day of the French speaking exam.
  5. It was surprising that Belinda managed to not be selected for the county.
  6. When students exceed expectations, it makes the job worthwhile.
  7. The boy’s performance in MacBeth was unbelieveable!
  8. Teachers regularly complain about the unmanageable workload they face.
  9. The appointment of the new deputy has been a valuable addition to the staff.
  10. The boy was transferred to a different school due to his poor behaviour.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

Exclusive: Give teens more ‘healthy’ stress

“Teenagers need more opportunities to experience stress a leading independent school headteacher has said.

Shaun Fenton, headmaster of Hull grammar School said stress was too often seen as harmful to children when, in fact it could be an enormous help in their lives.

In September, Mr fenton will take over as chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference – the grouping representing many of the leading independent schools

“Theres a danger in our narrative around teenage life that we see stress as a negative actually, we want children to have a whole life a balanced life, and that means ups and downs, he said.

“To help students to say, ‘Over the next few years, Im going to have a few relationship issues, I’m going to have challenges to overcome lots of good days and a few that arent so good.'”

Mr Fenton thinks extracurricular activities can provide teenagers with a muchneeded dose of “healthy” stress.

Answers: 

Exclusive: Give teens more ‘healthy’ stress

“Teenagers need more opportunities to experience stress” a leading independent school headteacher has said.

Shaun Fenton, headmaster of Hull Grammar School said stress was too often seen as harmful to children when, in fact, it could be an enormous help in their lives.

In September, Mr Fenton will take over as chair of the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference – the grouping representing many of the leading independent schools.

“There’s a danger in our narrative around teenage life that we see stress as a negative. Actually, we want children to have a whole life, a balanced life, and that means ups and downs,” he said.

“To help students to say, ‘Over the next few years, I’m going to have a few relationship issues, I’m going to have challenges to overcome, lots of good days and a few that aren’t so good.'”

Mr Fenton thinks extracurricular activities can provide teenagers with a much-needed dose of “healthy” stress.

Part 3A – Grammar

I am writing to inform you that

  1. we are deciding to change our Modern Foreign Languages offer
  2. we have made the decision to change our Modern Foreign Languages offer
  3. we made the decision to change our Modern Foreign Languages offer
  4. we decided on a change in our Modern Foreign Languages offer

from French and German to French and Spanish.

Those students currently in Year 7

  1. are going to be the primary part of this transition
  2. shall be the first part of this transition
  3. will be the first part of this transition
  4. can be the first part of this transition

and will study Spanish instead of German from September onwards.

This curriculum change

  1. reflects nationally a shift in the MFL offer within schools
  2. reflects a national shift in the MFL offer within schools
  3. reflects a national shift in offering MFL within schools
  4. reflects a national offering shift in MFL within schools

and it is the result of careful consideration and discussion.

Part 3B – Grammar

Following recent successful trips, I am hoping to take another group of students to Rome and the Bay of Naples.

  1. This would be a six-day trip, flying to Rome for three days and then travelling by coach
  2. This would be a six-day trip, flying to Rome for three days and then we will travel by coach
  3. This can be a six-day trip, flying to Rome for three days and then travelling by coach
  4. This can be a six-day trip, flying to Rome for three days and then we will travel by coach

to the Bay of Naples.

The geography and architecture of ancient Rome

  1. is very much in evidence still in and underneath the modern city.
  2. is still very much evident in and underneath the modern city.
  3. is very much evident still in and underneath the modern city.
  4. is still very much in evidence in and underneath the modern city.

We will see the Forum, Colosseum and Circus Maximus,

  1. as well as explore the Vatican and many of Rome’s wonderful churches.
  2. as well as exploring the Vatican and many of Rome’s wonderful churches.
  3. as well as exploring the Vatican and lots of Rome’s wonderful churches.

as well as explore the Vatican and lots of Romes’ wonderful churches.

Part 3C – Grammar

Art and Design at Key Stage 3 is an exciting time

in which to learn lots of

  1. to learn a variety of
  2. for learning a variety of
  3. for learning varied
  4. new skills and techniques at Huddersfield School.

We are lucky to have a kiln

  1. which allow our students to create ceramic works and use a variety of printing methods.
  2. which allows our students to create ceramic works and uses a variety of printing methods.
  3. which allows our students the creation of ceramic works and uses a variety of printing methods.
  4. which allow our students the creation ceramic works and use a variety of printing methods.

Your son/daughter will also have the opportunity to take all their art work home

  1. when it has been displayed around school.
  2. once it was displayed around school.
  3. after it was displayed around school.
  4. after it has been displayed around school.

Part 3D – Grammar

Tuesday 1st October is likely to see strike action by the NASUWT teaching union. This regional strike is part of

  1. an ongoing campaign
  2. a continuing campaign
  3. a continuous campaign
  4. an outstanding campaign

relating to pensions and working conditions.

Since the  majority of our staff have indicated that they will be on strike that day,

  1. I will be unable to normally open the school if this strike goes ahead.
  2. I will be normally be unable to open the school if this strike goes ahead.
  3. I will be unable to open the school normally if this strike goes ahead.
  4. normally, I will be unable to open the school if this strike goes ahead.

After completing a risk assessment

  1. I decided to close the school completely
  2. I had have decided to close the school completely
  3. I have decided to close the school completely
  4. I have decided to close completely the school

to Years 7-11 and to maintain a partial opening for Year 12 and 13.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

School assemblies should never just be about giving out certificates and reading notices – they should be among the most inspiring lessons a teacher can deliver, writes one principal.

Teaching is a privilege. How else can we describe the joy of sharing knowledge with young people, some of whom are actively keen to listen and most of whom, most of the time, are willing to be cajoled into doing so?

If we take this idea further: amplify the privilege, increase the number of students, improve attention, and choose the most amazing pieces of learning to share, then we have invented the assembly – the epitome of a teacher’s privilege (which may be why it’s often jealously guarded by senior leaders).

There are constraints, of course: large numbers make individual connections difficult and the opportunity for students to do anything other than listen and think are limited. But working within constraints has always inspired artists and the assembly is an art form.

When I was a middle leader just beginning to think about assemblies as something more than a disruption to be endured, I was told by my deputy head that the assembly was unparalleled as a vehicle for communicating your purpose to the whole school. Giving out certificates and sharing notices are good things but they should not be allowed to crowd the learning out.

Assemblies should teach. If they don’t, the purpose you are communicating is not one of learning and everyone will begin to wonder what kind of school they are in: assemblies set the tone, they develop the ethos, they are key to defining the community. They teach and they develop ethos but they must also entertain – otherwise the words will pass through the ears of the audience without ever interacting with their minds – listening for 10 or 15 minutes to the same voice is hard.

An assembly is a work of art: you are telling a story, sharing knowledge that is interesting or important or curious. Meanwhile, you have a message, an articulation of ethos, a central idea that you want students to take away with them, but you don’t want to be caught preaching. The starring characters can be heroes, villains, or, more likely, mere complicated humans to make the point. I give a lot of assemblies now and I’m always aware of the privilege of having the (almost) undivided attention of several hundred busy people. I, therefore, try my best to be interesting.

From this rich tapestry, I’ve been able to talk seriously about how we treat disability, about the importance of making memories, about how critical thought and being wrong loudly can improve learning, and about what can, and should, motivate us as we go out into a competitive world.

Crafting a good assembly is not an easy thing and we rarely get feedback on how well we’ve done: next time you’re listening to one think about how well it teaches, inspires and interests its audience and, either give some feedback (if you think it will be welcomed), and, when you get that opportunity, seize it – giving an assembly is a privilege not to be passed up.

Part A: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

Explicitly contradicted

Supported

No evidence

1. Handing out certificates during an assembly is a poor use of assembly time.

Supported

2. Teachers should, where possible, try to give feedback after an assembly, including negative feedback.

Explicitly contradicted

3. In the majority of assemblies it is important to not pass up an opportunity to mention the British values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect.

No evidence

Part B: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Classroom teachers in general – M
  2. PGCE students
  3. Parents – L
  4. Heads of department
  5. Teachers of geography
  6. Ofsted inspectors

Part C: 

Select three most appropriate titles for this article:

  1. The best assemblies entertain, inspire and impart knowledge
  2. Make sure your assembly isn’t too long
  3. How to structure your assembly
  4. Short, snappy messages the key to assembly success, say Ofsted
  5. Use an assembly to help develop the ethos of your school
  6. Senior leaders hogging assembly privilege
  7. Delivering an assembly is an opportunity you should never pass up
  8. The key to an assembly: connect with the kids!

Part D: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. One of the challenges in delivering an assembly is trying to make it personal
  2. Delivering an assembly can be a very time-consuming and unwelcome part of a teacher’s week
  3. In an assembly, it is a good idea not to lecture the audience at length
  4. It’s really important to use real people when delivering your anecdotes and footballers and pop stars are perfect examples of this
  5. Delivering an assembly is difficult if you have poor behavior management skills
  6. Reading important notices can be part of an assembly, but should be more of an afterthought
  7. You can use video clips to reduce the amount of teacher-talk, which will make it easier for the audience to listen
  8. You should never use poor role models in an assembly to prove a point