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Test 8 Solutions

Test 8 Solutions 2018-07-17T20:19:37+00:00

Part 1 – Spelling

  1. The administration fee will be waived if payment is made before June.
  2. His parents were relieved to hear that Jack had not been excluded.
  3. Simon behaved poorly in two separate lessons on Tuesday.
  4. There are many words in French which the class pronounced
  5. I am genuinely relieved that the parents were so understanding.
  6. The recommendation was that the class should devise a plan before starting the essay.
  7. The staff agree in principle, but decline any personal responsibility.
  8. In the old days, being a woman was synonymous with being a housewife.
  9. The boy has temporarily been placed in the withdrawal room following his disruptive behaviour in the art class.
  10. On the previous page is an explanation of how the solar system works.

Part 2 – Punctuation

Question Text:

‘Sats dont prepare pupils for secondary school. So what’s their purpose? To impress Ofsted?’

I wished a friend at school a pleasant and restful easter break and she replied: “well, my son has his sats xams after the Easter holidays, and his school has given him some work to do over the Easter break.”

“Why” was my instinctive response. Hes 10 years old and will have had a full term of Sats preparation (to the back teeth probably.

And this wasnt a unique situation thousands of children would have been asked by parents to complete tasks in preparation for the upcoming Sats exams. These skills are important however, I think we need to gain a little perspective at this juncture.

As a secondary school English teacher I know how the Sats are currently received.

Students arrived in Year 7 with these “amazing Sats results and when we as the secondary school, assessed them in the first half term it always looked as though the students had regressed on arrival!

Answers: 

‘Sats don’t prepare pupils for secondary school. So what’s their purpose? To impress Ofsted?’

I wished a friend at school a pleasant and restful Easter break, and she replied: “well, my son has his Sats xams after the Easter holidays, and his school has given him some work to do over the Easter break.”

“Why?” was my instinctive response. He’s 10 years old and will have had a full term of Sats preparation (to the back teeth probably).

And this wasn’t a unique situation. Thousands of children would have been asked by parents to complete tasks in preparation for the upcoming Sats exams. These skills are important; however, I think we need to gain a little perspective at this juncture.

As a secondary school English teacher, I know how the Sats are currently received.

Students arrived in Year 7 with these “amazing” Sats results and when we, as the secondary school, assessed them in the first half term it always looked as though the students had regressed on arrival!

Part 3A – Grammar

Your child has the opportunity to take part in Advanced Cyclist Training at school. The training will take place during school time in a single 2 hour session

  1. and is delivered from professional trainers qualified
  2. and is delivered by professional trainers qualified
  3. and will be delivered by professional trainers qualified
  4. and will be delivered from professional trainers qualified

to the Bikeability National Standards.

Your child will be trained on roads near to the school and, where possible,

  1. includes the planning, and riding of, the safest route between home and school.
  2. will include the planning and riding of a safety route between home and school.
  3. will include the planning, and riding of, the safest route between home and school.
  4. will include planning and riding of the safest route between home and school.
  5. The wearing of cycle helmets is discretionary and is left
  6. Wearing a cycle helmet is your choice and is left
  7. Wearing a cycle helmet is up to you and is left
  8. The wearing of cycle helmets is your decision and is left

to the decision of parents/carers or the school policy.

Part 3B – Grammar

We are delighted to invite you to a Homework Information Evening.

  1. The purpose of the evening is to provide parents with some guidance and information
  2. The purpose of the evening is providing parents with some guidance and information
  3. The evening’s purpose is providing parents with some guidance and information
  4. The purpose of the evening is providing guidance and information to parents

about how best to support your child.

Mr Bailey will run a session which will give

  1. further advise on how best to support your child in their subject
  2. further advice on how best to support your child in there subject
  3. further advise on how best to support your child in they’re subject
  4. further advice on how best to support your child in their subject

and details of the resources that you can use with your child.

The Directors of Learning

  1. will also be there to answer any general questions you may have.
  2. will also be present to answer any general questions you may have.
  3. will also be present for answering any general questions you may have.
  4. will also be present to generally answer any questions you may have.

Part 3C – Grammar

I am writing

  1. to inform you of a change to school uniform that
  1. to give information about a change to school uniform that
  2. to inform you of school’s uniform change that
  3. to inform you about a changes to school uniform that

will be introduced from this September.

This letter

  1. will give you advance warning
  2. is to give you advance warning
  3. is going to give you advance warning
  4. is to give you warning in advance

of this change.

The change is being introduced to improve

  1. the current standard of uniform being worn by students in the school, particularly by our female students.
  1. the current standard of uniform being worn by students in the school, particularly among the
  2. the standard of current uniform being worn by students in the school, particularly by our female students.
  3. the current standard of uniform being worn by students in the school, particularly by females.

Part 3D – Grammar

I would like to invite you to

  1. the first of this year’s Progress Review afternoons, which takes place
  2. this year’s first Progress Review afternoons which takes place
  3. the first of this year’s Progress Review afternoons which take place
  4. the first of this years’ Progress Review afternoons which takes place

on Thursday 4th December.

This meeting is a response

  1. to requests from parents to be able to review
  2. to parent’s requests to be able to review
  3. to parents requests’ for reviewing
  4. to parents’ requests to be able to review

their children’s progress on a more regular basis.

Please would you indicate

  1. on the attached reply slip whether or not you will attend.
  2. on the attached reply slip, whether or not you will be attending.
  3. on the reply slip attached whether or not you will be attending.
  4. on the attached reply slip if you will attend.

Part 4 – Comprehension

Comprehension Text

Cheating, pressure to improve results, stress. Now campaigners call for a different approach to assessing children.

When children across England start their week of Sats tests next month, 30 primary schools will be under particular scrutiny. That is because children from those schools have performed poorly once they have moved to secondary schools. That has raised suspicions that their good Sats results were the result of cheating. Children from other primary schools feeding the same secondary schools, meanwhile, have performed roughly as expected.

“For example, if the children were predicted 10 GCSE grade Bs, they would get 10 Cs,” said Dave Thomson, chief statistician at Education Data Lab, which carried out the analysis. “I don’t think we can say with absolute certainty why this is happening but it warrants further investigation.”

Cheating is one of the many reasons why Sats continue to face serious opposition. Parent groups such as Let Our Kids Be Kids plan to boycott Sats this year by taking their children out of primary school when the tests start on 14 May. Last year a headteacher of a Leeds primary school locked the Sats papers in a cupboard and took the children to the Captain Cook Museum in Whitby instead.

Campaigners against Sats object to the huge pressure primary schools are under to deliver improvements year after year, which they say encourages schools to teach only the core subjects of reading, writing and mathematics, almost abandoning art, music, foreign languages and even science, which is only assessed in a random selection of schools.

“Schools are judged, compared and ranked on these results,” said James Bowen from the National Association of Head Teachers.
“If the scores aren’t good enough, teachers start fearing the implications and the interventions they might face – even the future of the school. The stakes are far too high.”

Those stakes are high enough for some teachers to risk their careers. Over the last 12 months, three headteachers have been taken to a disciplinary panel of the National College for Training and Leadership – now the Teaching Regulation Agency – for altering Sats papers after they had been completed. In each case the heads resigned or were dismissed.

A National Union of Teachers source told the Observer that in other cases, borderline pupils had done Sats in the headteacher’s office so they could be helped to get the right answers. “Another head prepared for a mental maths test by giving all the children a copy of the paper so they could see the questions,” the source said. “There was a teacher who read the multiple choice test aloud and emphasised the right answers. One pressed so hard when she was altering exam scripts that the marks came through on other papers in the pile underneath.

“Those numbers are an overwhelming minority of cases,” Bowen said. “You have to question what is going on with the system where people feel driven to that kind of behaviour. No one trains to be a teacher thinking ‘one day I’m going to cheat in tests’. It says something about the system where people feel under so much pressure they start taking questionable action.”

While the vast majority of the 15,000 primary schools in England do not cheat, Sats are still seen by some as disruptive. Little London primary school in Leeds decided to boycott the exams last year after parents backed the idea in a consultation, says Ivelina Metchkarova, whose son was in year six. The key factor was that school would continue as normal in the remaining eight weeks of term after Sats finished.

“We were told that if there are no Sats, but there are extra assessments, then there will be continuous learning throughout the year until July,” she said. “If there had been Sats, after they finished the school would have been putting on plays. My son learned a huge amount in those three months and it really built his confidence.”

Unlike GCSEs and A-levels, Sats have no bearing on a child’s future – they aren’t used for school selection, and primary schools send far more detailed assessments of each child when they move up to secondary level. Yet there is growing concern that the stress felt by teachers trickles down to the children. The Commons education committee said last year that young children were at risk of developing mental health problems, with evidence that growing numbers of children suffering from panic attacks, anxiety and depression.

Part A: 

Select three most appropriate titles for this article:

  1. Evidence of malpractice in administration calling into question Sats accuracy
  2. Stakes too high for primary school teachers
  3. Must do better? Why parents plan boycott of school Sats tests
  4. “I’d rather go to Whitby than do Sats tests,” says headteacher
  5. Modern languages neglected in bid to boost Sats scores
  6. Sats tests piling the pressure on teachers and pupils
  7. Cheating in Sats tests causing serious issues for the majority of secondary schools
  8. Schools forced to lock Sats tests away to prevent teachers from cheating

Part B: 

Select the three statements that are true:

  1. If primary schools cheat in the Sats, it can quite easily be traced when there is a pattern of underachievement at GCSE level
  2. No school subjects are being neglected as a result of preparing pupils for Sats
  3. The majority of primary schools have suspicious Sats results
  4. Poor Sats scores could create possible problems for classroom teachers
  5. Schools are closed down when Sats results aren’t good enough
  6. Sats are crucial for a child’s progress and development
  7. Teachers’ stress can have a negative effect on the pupils they teach
  8. Sats can be ignored provided a school replaces them with something of educational value

Part C: 

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article, although some of them would find it more useful than others.  Which group would find it the most relevant and which group would find it the least relevant?

Drag and drop the M into the box next to the choice you consider most relevant and the L for the choice you consider to be least relevant.

  1. Heads of year
  2. Head teachers of primary schools – M
  3. Classroom teachers in general
  4. Parents
  5. Primary school teachers
  6. Secondary school teachers – L
  7. Ofsted inspectors

Part D: 

Read the statements below and, based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen, decide to what extent each statement is supported in the text.

No evidence

Supported

Implied

1. Certain primary schools are under investigation as a result of a pattern of underachievement at secondary school.

Supported

2. Humanities subjects, such as religious studies and geography, are being neglected so that primary schools can focus on Sats tests.

No evidence

3. Once Sats are completed in year six, it would appear that there is no longer much traditional learning taking place in primary schools.

Implied