Literacy Skills Practice Test

Please read these instructions carefully before you start this test.

The test will start when you press next.

The test contains four sections, each of which are worth the following marks:

  • Spelling – 10 marks
  • Punctuation – 15 marks
  • Grammar – 8 to 12 marks
  • Comprehension – 8 to 12 marks

The tests are designed to help you become familiar with the format of the professional literacy skills test and give you practise answering questions similar to those seen in the actual exam.

In your actual exam you will be provided with headphones and some paper which you can use for workings out if you wish. For these tests make sure your sound is on for the spelling section.

You press next to move to the next question and you can also use the navigational menu at the bottom of the screen to do this.

The time limit applies to all of the questions. You are allowed to go back to a question and change your answer if you decide to, as long as it is within the overall time limit. However, you can’t go back to the spelling section once you have completed it.

When you select ‘End Test’ the test will finish regardless of whether you have answered all of the questions or you have used up the time, so make sure you have finished before clicking this button.

Navigational Features for The Literacy Skills Practice Tests.

Please find below a description of how to navigate your way through the test. Read the guidance carefully. If you are still unsure please contact us via phone or email for more information.

Clicking on ‘Next Question’ will move you onto the question that immediately follows

The current question you are viewing will be highlighted blue.

Click on a number to go to that specific question.

“In” displays information about the test.

“N” displays the test navigation guidance at the start of the test.

Clicking “End Test” when you have finished the test will submit your answers.

Once you have clicked end test, you will not be able to go back to the tests.

Clock shows the time remaining on the test

“Pause” Will stop the test at your current position. You will then be able to resume the test later. This will not be available in the real tests.

Spelling

Click on the audio next to the box in each of the sentences below and listen to the word

Type the dictated word in the text box

You may correct your answer as you type.

You may go back to a answer and delete the whole word or add or delete letters within a word

Please note once you move away this screen you will not be able to return to the spelling section.

  1. The climate is rather  ————– , and rapid falls of temperature are not uncommon.

  2. The student   —— would like a non-uniform day this term.

  3. I am   —– of the fact that the class can be extremely challenging.

  4. —— there are many teachers who never mark their students’ work.

  5. Giving a pupil a in a lesson can be a great way to build confidence.

  6. We need to order some more ————– before the end of term.

  7. Many of the school policies are questionable, ————– no useful function.

  8. The teacher was trying to ————– whether the class understood the key teaching point or not.

  9. The ————– needs to act in order to recruit more teachers into the profession.

  10. Education is a topic which is often spoken about in ————–.

Guide Me

No guidance shall be given for the spelling section of the test. To see answers use the “Show me button”

Show Me

The climate is rather  ————– , and rapid falls of temperature are not uncommon.

The student   —— would like a non-uniform day this term.

I am   —– of the fact that the class can be extremely challenging.

—— there are many teachers who never mark their students’ work.

Giving a pupil a in a lesson can be a great way to build confidence.

We need to order some more ————– before the end of term.

Many of the school policies are questionable, ————– no useful function.

The teacher was trying to ————– whether the class understood the key teaching point or not.

The ————– needs to act in order to recruit more teachers into the profession.

Education is a topic which is often spoken about in ————–.

Punctuation

Correct 15 essential punctuation omissions in the passage below

Don’t delete text; only add punctuation, including amendments to capitalisation, when required.

Detailed instruction

  • Click the word nearest to where you wish to add punctuation. A dialogue box will appear with the word inside. Use to mouse to select which part of the word you wish to add punctuation to. (e.g. the start of the word or the end of the word.)
  • Once you are happy with that punctuation click the “Ok” button.
  • To remove all punctuation additions you have made to a word click the “Reset” button
  • You do not need to delete any text, only add punctuation, capitalise and add paragraph breaks. 
  • If you select a word but do not wish to make any amendments click cancel.
  • To capitalise a word, select the word, then click the “capitalise” button.  Then press “Ok”

Fidget spinners

Fidget spinners, dabbing, bottle flipping… teachers can find it hard to keep up with every new fad so heres the lowdown on the floss dance and how to deal with it in your classroom.

Have your students been stiffly swinging their arms and hips from side to side in a bizarre asymmetric rhythm If you have yet to witness this ‘dance, it wont be long before you do.

The ‘floss’ dance has quickly picked up momentum over the past few months and for many teachers its now difficult to get through the day without seeing kids flossing in the classroom like the Backpack Kid from this viral video sensation.

Where did it come from

Fifteen-year-old Russell Horning better known as The Backpack Kid, is the creator of the floss dance. Horning was already popular on social media for posts of his stiffarmed dancing, but he was then picked up by Saturday night Live to perform the ‘floss’ dance as part of Katy Perrys Swish Swish performance.

When flossing sways its way into lesson time, something needs to be done before it gets out of hand most teachers will simply use the behaviour policy to stamp it out

Guide Me

Help Text

Show Me

Show me content

Grammar

Grammar Task A

Complete the following passage. Select the best of the given alternatives at the points at which there are blank lines. Click on one of the choices and drag it into the relevant blank link.

To change your answer, click and drag the answer back to the box, the click and drag an alternative choice.

  • In order to support your son/daughter —– we are running a Revision Skills Support session.

    1. with the preparation for GCSE exams,
    2. for preparing for GCSE exams,
    3. in the preparation of GCSE exams,
    4. about the preparation for GCSE exams,
  • —– we will use a study skills company

    1. The intent is that, during this time,
    2. The intention is that, when this happens,
    3. The intention is that, during this time,
    4. The intent is that, when this happens,
  • —– designed to support your son/daughter with his/her revision skills.

    1. to deliver a two-hour workshop
    2. to deliver a workshop during two hours
    3. for delivering a two hour workshop
    4. to deliver a workshop of too hours

Guide Me

answer1

Answer2

Answer3

Show Me

In order to support your son/daughter with the preparation for GCSE exams, we are running a Revision Skills Support session.The intention is that, during this time, we will use a study skills companyto deliver a two hour workshop designed to support your son/daughter with his/her revision skills.

Grammar

Grammar Task B

Complete the following passage. Select the best of the given alternatives at the points at which there are blank lines. Click on one of the choices and drag it into the relevant blank link.

To change your answer, click and drag the answer back to the box, the click and drag an alternative choice.

  • As you know, your child has been taking part in a mentoring project in school —–  the University of York.

    1. in collaboration by
    2. in collaboration through
    3. with collaboration in
    4. in collaboration with
  • Your child has worked very hard to continue with their GCSE studies —–

    1. and will take on the extra tutoring they have received
    2. and make use of the extra tutoring they have received
    3. and take on the extra tutoring they had received
    4. and made use of the extra tutoring they will have received
  • and this celebration event will be —– 

    1. a time for us to thank their mentors appropriately.
    2. an appropriate time for us to thank their mentors.
    3. a time for us to thank their appropriate mentors.
    4. a time for us to be appropriate and thank their mentors.

Guide Me

Answer4

Answer5

Answer6

Show Me

Grammar

Grammar Task C

Complete the following passage. Select the best of the given alternatives at the points at which there are blank lines. Click on one of the choices and drag it into the relevant blank link.

To change your answer, click and drag the answer back to the box, the click and drag an alternative choice.

  • Your child has nearly completed Key Stage 3 and from next year —–

    1. are starting there GCSE qualifications.
    2. will start their GCSE qualifications.
    3. will start they’re GCSE qualifications.
    4. are starting they’re GCSE qualifications.
  •  —–  a core curriculum, your child will also take four additional GCSEs

    1. While all students are following
    2. While all students’ follow
    3. While all student’s follow
    4. While all students will follow
  •  —–

    1. with his / her own choice.
    2. of his / her own choice.
    3. through his / her own choice.
    4. by his / her own choice.

Guide Me

Answer7

Answer8

Answer9

Show Me

Grammar

Grammar Task D

Complete the following passage. Select the best of the given alternatives at the points at which there are blank lines. Click on one of the choices and drag it into the relevant blank link.

To change your answer, click and drag the answer back to the box, the click and drag an alternative choice.

  • I am planning a trip to York University. This will give students  —– 

    1. an experience of a campus university environment
    2. ideas about a campus universitys environment
    3. an idea of the environment of a campus university’s
    4. an idea of a campus environments in a university
  • and will enable them  —– they will make in the future.

    1. to compare this with other visits to other universities
    2. to compare this with other university visits
    3. to compare this with visits to other university’s
    4. to compare this with other university visits’
  • The trip will include a guided tour of the campus  —–

    1. and talking from a member of the school liaison department.
    2. and a talk from a member of the school liaison department.
    3. and a talk from a member of the liaison school’s department.
    4. and a talk from the school liaison department member.

Guide Me

Answer10

Answer11

Answer12

Show Me

Comprehension

‘Instead of focusing on narrowing the curriculum with the Ebacc, the government needs to focus on increasing MFL knowledge in schools – it will be crucial in a post-Brexit Britain’

According to its figures, 61 per cent of Brits speak no other language than English – a proportion, it’s speculated that will rise as EU nationals and British linguists leave the country for jobs abroad, taking their skills with them. At the same time, English will decline as a global language – it’s already been replaced by Chinese, Hindi and Spanish, which all have more native speakers.

Are we bad at languages in this country because of the quality of teaching and teacher shortages? Or is it because we’re ambivalent about others and their culture?
As we hurtle towards March 2019, it is one of many issues ministers need to address. As we face the reality of leaving the EU, languages are just one aspect of the deficits in our education system. And, so far, there has been little evidence of any joined-up thinking between government rhetoric and domestic practicalities.
Where, for example, are the policies to implement more vocational and skills-based learning?

Preoccupied with the external machinations of leaving the EU, the government hasn’t laid out how it plans to keep the country functioning from 2019 onwards. Who is going to do the hands-on work, like designing, making, installing and fixing things?

If the government wants EU nationals gone, wouldn’t it be better to start skilling up our own population to take over? The time for snobby sneering at vocational education has gone. This is one of the reasons we had an over-reliance on overseas labour to begin with – we’ve never trained enough of our own. Instead, ministers plough on with the academically-focussed EBacc like none of this is happening. No-one’s going to need a classicist when the boiler is on the blink.
The reality is, of course, that we Brits excel at languages. There can be few countries in the world so linguistically-diverse, but we just don’t value what we know. This is why GCSEs or A-levels in ethnic minority languages are periodically under threat of the axe by the exam boards – and the pupils who sit them can’t have their results included in league tables. That would be cheating, you see.

Accountability in a narrow range of subjects is more important to governments than what young people know and can do, irrespective of where they learn it.
Thanks to decades of immigration, multilingualism is one of our nation’s great assets. It comes at virtually no cost to the state because it is mainly learned at home. And with that knowledge comes an understanding of the nuance of language and culture, which will be so important in negotiating hundreds of trade and other deals in the coming years.

As Peter Bone, one of my social media correspondents observed on Twitter recently: “As a German speaker, I’ve been aware of the ambivalence towards languages for a long time. Recent developments, Brexit, have turned ambivalence into hostility and it shrinks our world. We seem to be heading for a rather squalid isolation.” And, we are.

Task A

Read the statements below and based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen.

Click and drag the “Tick” into the box besides your chosen answers.

Select the three most appropriate titles for this article: 

  • Chinese, Hindi and Spanish to be the main languages taught in secondary schools
  • Why is the government ignoring the decline of modern languages in schools?
  • Quality of teaching: the reason why Brits are bad at languages
  • Modern languages to be shelved post-Brexit
  • Post-Brexit, we need languages more than ever
  • Vocational training more important than languages, say government officials
  • 61% of Britain monolingual, a figure set to rise
  • With EU nationals departing, modern foreign languages to be made optional at key stage 4

Guide Me

Show Me

  • Chinese, Hindi and Spanish to be the main languages taught in secondary schools: 0
  • Why is the government ignoring the decline of modern languages in schools?: 1
  • Quality of teaching: the reason why Brits are bad at languages: 0
  • Modern languages to be shelved post-Brexit: 0
  • Post-Brexit, we need languages more than ever: 1
  • Vocational training more important than languages, say government officials: 0
  • 61% of Britain monolingual, a figure set to rise: 1
  • With EU nationals departing, modern foreign languages to be made optional at key stage 4: 0
Comprehension

‘Instead of focusing on narrowing the curriculum with the Ebacc, the government needs to focus on increasing MFL knowledge in schools – it will be crucial in a post-Brexit Britain’

According to its figures, 61 per cent of Brits speak no other language than English – a proportion, it’s speculated that will rise as EU nationals and British linguists leave the country for jobs abroad, taking their skills with them. At the same time, English will decline as a global language – it’s already been replaced by Chinese, Hindi and Spanish, which all have more native speakers.

Are we bad at languages in this country because of the quality of teaching and teacher shortages? Or is it because we’re ambivalent about others and their culture?
As we hurtle towards March 2019, it is one of many issues ministers need to address. As we face the reality of leaving the EU, languages are just one aspect of the deficits in our education system. And, so far, there has been little evidence of any joined-up thinking between government rhetoric and domestic practicalities.
Where, for example, are the policies to implement more vocational and skills-based learning?

Preoccupied with the external machinations of leaving the EU, the government hasn’t laid out how it plans to keep the country functioning from 2019 onwards. Who is going to do the hands-on work, like designing, making, installing and fixing things?

If the government wants EU nationals gone, wouldn’t it be better to start skilling up our own population to take over? The time for snobby sneering at vocational education has gone. This is one of the reasons we had an over-reliance on overseas labour to begin with – we’ve never trained enough of our own. Instead, ministers plough on with the academically-focussed EBacc like none of this is happening. No-one’s going to need a classicist when the boiler is on the blink.
The reality is, of course, that we Brits excel at languages. There can be few countries in the world so linguistically-diverse, but we just don’t value what we know. This is why GCSEs or A-levels in ethnic minority languages are periodically under threat of the axe by the exam boards – and the pupils who sit them can’t have their results included in league tables. That would be cheating, you see.

Accountability in a narrow range of subjects is more important to governments than what young people know and can do, irrespective of where they learn it.
Thanks to decades of immigration, multilingualism is one of our nation’s great assets. It comes at virtually no cost to the state because it is mainly learned at home. And with that knowledge comes an understanding of the nuance of language and culture, which will be so important in negotiating hundreds of trade and other deals in the coming years.

As Peter Bone, one of my social media correspondents observed on Twitter recently: “As a German speaker, I’ve been aware of the ambivalence towards languages for a long time. Recent developments, Brexit, have turned ambivalence into hostility and it shrinks our world. We seem to be heading for a rather squalid isolation.” And, we are.

Task B

Read the statements below and based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen.

Click and drag the “Tick” into the box besides your chosen answers.

Select the three statements that are true:

  • Foreign language learning is arguably the main problem with the current education system
  • English is starting to lose its status as the most important language in the world to learn.
  • The government is more concerned about leaving the European Union than planning what will happen afterwards
  • British people struggle with foreign language learning
  • There will be few plumbers available when we leave the EU
  • Vocational training is less important than doing well in the EBacc subjects
  • One of the best things about the UK is that so many different languages are spoken
  • Schools can boost their GCSE results by making ethnic minority pupils sit GCSE exams in their home language

Guide Me

comprehension 2 Help Text

 

Show Me

  • Foreign language learning is arguably the main problem with the current education system:0
  • English is starting to lose its status as the most important language in the world to learn.:1
  • The government is more concerned about leaving the European Union than planning what will happen afterwards:1
  • British people struggle with foreign language learning:0
  • There will be few plumbers available when we leave the EU:0
  • Vocational training is less important than doing well in the EBacc subjects:0
  • One of the best things about the UK is that so many different languages are spoken:1
  • Schools can boost their GCSE results by making ethnic minority pupils sit GCSE exams in their home language :0
Comprehension

‘Instead of focusing on narrowing the curriculum with the Ebacc, the government needs to focus on increasing MFL knowledge in schools – it will be crucial in a post-Brexit Britain’

According to its figures, 61 per cent of Brits speak no other language than English – a proportion, it’s speculated that will rise as EU nationals and British linguists leave the country for jobs abroad, taking their skills with them. At the same time, English will decline as a global language – it’s already been replaced by Chinese, Hindi and Spanish, which all have more native speakers.

Are we bad at languages in this country because of the quality of teaching and teacher shortages? Or is it because we’re ambivalent about others and their culture?
As we hurtle towards March 2019, it is one of many issues ministers need to address. As we face the reality of leaving the EU, languages are just one aspect of the deficits in our education system. And, so far, there has been little evidence of any joined-up thinking between government rhetoric and domestic practicalities.
Where, for example, are the policies to implement more vocational and skills-based learning?

Preoccupied with the external machinations of leaving the EU, the government hasn’t laid out how it plans to keep the country functioning from 2019 onwards. Who is going to do the hands-on work, like designing, making, installing and fixing things?

If the government wants EU nationals gone, wouldn’t it be better to start skilling up our own population to take over? The time for snobby sneering at vocational education has gone. This is one of the reasons we had an over-reliance on overseas labour to begin with – we’ve never trained enough of our own. Instead, ministers plough on with the academically-focussed EBacc like none of this is happening. No-one’s going to need a classicist when the boiler is on the blink.
The reality is, of course, that we Brits excel at languages. There can be few countries in the world so linguistically-diverse, but we just don’t value what we know. This is why GCSEs or A-levels in ethnic minority languages are periodically under threat of the axe by the exam boards – and the pupils who sit them can’t have their results included in league tables. That would be cheating, you see.

Accountability in a narrow range of subjects is more important to governments than what young people know and can do, irrespective of where they learn it.
Thanks to decades of immigration, multilingualism is one of our nation’s great assets. It comes at virtually no cost to the state because it is mainly learned at home. And with that knowledge comes an understanding of the nuance of language and culture, which will be so important in negotiating hundreds of trade and other deals in the coming years.

As Peter Bone, one of my social media correspondents observed on Twitter recently: “As a German speaker, I’ve been aware of the ambivalence towards languages for a long time. Recent developments, Brexit, have turned ambivalence into hostility and it shrinks our world. We seem to be heading for a rather squalid isolation.” And, we are.

Task C

Read the statements below and based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen.

Click and drag the “Tick” into the box besides your chosen answers.

From the list below select the 3 main points that most accurately describe the intended purpose of the article:

  • To raise awareness of the declining levels of second languages in this country and the potential impacts on social cohesion.
  • To highlight how poor the government is with foreign affairs and international relations.
  • To highlight a growing concern with the reduction in MFL participation.
  • To raise concerns with the attitudes towards learning a second language.
  • To support the increase in racial tensions within the EU.
  • To promote social cohesion within the EU by bringing together many countries.
  • To support the ambivalence towards MFL and its proliferation through schools and the education system.

Guide Me

comprehension 3 Help Text

 

Show Me

  • Foreign language learning is arguably the main problem with the current education system:0
  • English is starting to lose its status as the most important language in the world to learn.:1
  • The government is more concerned about leaving the European Union than planning what will happen afterwards:1
  • British people struggle with foreign language learning:0
  • There will be few plumbers available when we leave the EU:0
  • Vocational training is less important than doing well in the EBacc subjects:0
  • One of the best things about the UK is that so many different languages are spoken:1
  • Schools can boost their GCSE results by making ethnic minority pupils sit GCSE exams in their home language :0
Comprehension

‘Instead of focusing on narrowing the curriculum with the Ebacc, the government needs to focus on increasing MFL knowledge in schools – it will be crucial in a post-Brexit Britain’

According to its figures, 61 per cent of Brits speak no other language than English – a proportion, it’s speculated that will rise as EU nationals and British linguists leave the country for jobs abroad, taking their skills with them. At the same time, English will decline as a global language – it’s already been replaced by Chinese, Hindi and Spanish, which all have more native speakers.

Are we bad at languages in this country because of the quality of teaching and teacher shortages? Or is it because we’re ambivalent about others and their culture?
As we hurtle towards March 2019, it is one of many issues ministers need to address. As we face the reality of leaving the EU, languages are just one aspect of the deficits in our education system. And, so far, there has been little evidence of any joined-up thinking between government rhetoric and domestic practicalities.
Where, for example, are the policies to implement more vocational and skills-based learning?

Preoccupied with the external machinations of leaving the EU, the government hasn’t laid out how it plans to keep the country functioning from 2019 onwards. Who is going to do the hands-on work, like designing, making, installing and fixing things?

If the government wants EU nationals gone, wouldn’t it be better to start skilling up our own population to take over? The time for snobby sneering at vocational education has gone. This is one of the reasons we had an over-reliance on overseas labour to begin with – we’ve never trained enough of our own. Instead, ministers plough on with the academically-focussed EBacc like none of this is happening. No-one’s going to need a classicist when the boiler is on the blink.
The reality is, of course, that we Brits excel at languages. There can be few countries in the world so linguistically-diverse, but we just don’t value what we know. This is why GCSEs or A-levels in ethnic minority languages are periodically under threat of the axe by the exam boards – and the pupils who sit them can’t have their results included in league tables. That would be cheating, you see.

Accountability in a narrow range of subjects is more important to governments than what young people know and can do, irrespective of where they learn it.
Thanks to decades of immigration, multilingualism is one of our nation’s great assets. It comes at virtually no cost to the state because it is mainly learned at home. And with that knowledge comes an understanding of the nuance of language and culture, which will be so important in negotiating hundreds of trade and other deals in the coming years.

As Peter Bone, one of my social media correspondents observed on Twitter recently: “As a German speaker, I’ve been aware of the ambivalence towards languages for a long time. Recent developments, Brexit, have turned ambivalence into hostility and it shrinks our world. We seem to be heading for a rather squalid isolation.” And, we are.

Task D

Read the statements below and based on the evidence provided by the passage on the left of the screen.

Click and drag your choice into the box besides your chosen answers.

The following groups might all be potential audiences or readers of the article but some may find it more interesting than others. Which group would find the article most relevant and which group would it be least relevant to?

Most Relevant (M)

Least Relevant (L)

  • Individuals interested in becoming English teachers.
  • Students
  • Language teachers and heads of department.
  • The general public.
  • Secondary school teachers.

Guide Me

comprehension 4

 

Show Me

  • Foreign language learning is arguably the main problem with the current education system:0
  • English is starting to lose its status as the most important language in the world to learn.:1
  • The government is more concerned about leaving the European Union than planning what will happen afterwards:1
  • British people struggle with foreign language learning:0
  • There will be few plumbers available when we leave the EU:0
  • Vocational training is less important than doing well in the EBacc subjects:0
  • One of the best things about the UK is that so many different languages are spoken:1
  • Schools can boost their GCSE results by making ethnic minority pupils sit GCSE exams in their home language :0